Best Hiking Trails in Brisbane

Best Hiking Trails in Brisbane
Man and kid walking on a trail in the afternoon. Source: Pexels

Below is a list of the top and leading Hiking Trails in Brisbane. To help you find the best Hiking Trails located near you in Brisbane, we put together our own list based on this rating points list.

Brisbane’s Best Hiking Trails:

The top rated Hiking Trails in Brisbane are:

  • Bunyaville Conservation Park
  • Mt. Coot-tha Forest
  • Venman Bushland National Park

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Bunyaville Conservation Park

Bunyaville Conservation Park
Bunyaville Conservation Park

Bunyaville Conservation Park is conveniently close to Brisbane city. The park is the perfect spot for a picnic or barbecue under the forest canopy. Barbecues, firewood, picnic tables, drinking water and toilets are provided.

Visitors can enjoy bushwalking, horse riding and cycling at Bunyaville. Dogs are allowed on shared trails only, provided they are kept on a leash at all times.

Dogs and horses are not permitted on designated walking tracks or mountain bike trails in the interests of visitor safety. Dogs and horses are not permitted in the picnic areas.

Products/Services:

Walking, Horse and mountain bike riding, Guided tours and talks, Picnic and day-use areas, Viewing wildlife

LOCATION:

Address: Old Northern Rd, Albany Creek QLD 4035
Phone: 137468
Website: www.npsr.qld.gov.au/parks/bunyaville

REVIEWS:

“Great trail network. Mostly beginner to intermediate level stuff. A few hills but nothing too nasty.” – Jerome Willies

Mt. Coot-tha Forest

Mt. Coot-tha Forest
Mt. Coot-tha Forest

Mt. Coot-tha Forest is a 15-minute drive west of the Brisbane Central Business District. Mt. Coot-tha is a Brisbane icon forming a backdrop for the city and is Brisbane City Council’s largest natural area. It contains more than 1600 hectares of open eucalypt forest, rainforest gullies and creek lines. Mt. Coot-tha Forest adjoins the south-eastern section of D’Aguilar National Park. These two natural areas include up to 40,000 hectares of forest and feature spectacular views, seasonal creeks and waterfalls.

Access to Mt. Coot-tha Forest is from Sir Samuel Griffith Drive or Gap Creek Road, Mt. Coot-tha. Limited parking is available.

Products/Services:

Walking/Hiking track, Picinic Areas, Flora and Fauna

LOCATION:

Address: Sir Samuel Griffith Dr, Mount Coot-Tha QLD 4066
Phone: (07) 3403 8888
Website: www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/things-to-see-and-do/council-venues-and-precincts/mt-coot-tha-precinct/mt-coot-tha-forest

REVIEWS:

“Beautiful walking tracks whichever way you walk.” – Jude L.

Venman Bushland National Park

Venman Bushland National Park
Venman Bushland National Park

Venman Bushland National Park has been a popular Brisbane recreation area for decades. It was originally private property—owned by local Jack Burnett Venman (1911–1994). Today, this 415ha park forms part of the Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area and is managed by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.

The open forest—a mixture of eucalypt and melaleuca trees and well-developed understorey of flowering shrubs—is home to koalas, common ringtail and common brushtail possums, sugar gliders, greater gliders, swamp and red-necked wallabies, powerful owls and many other birds.

The park protects the headwaters of Tingalpa Creek and its tributaries. For most of the year, the creeks are dry or reduced to a string of waterholes, as the creeks flow underground. Frogs, water rats and eastern water dragons live in and around the creeks.

Products/Services:

Walking trails, Mountain-bike riding and horseriding, Picnic and day-use areas, Viewing wildlife

LOCATION:

Address: W Mount Cotton Rd, Mount Cotton QLD 4165
Phone: (07) 3829 8999
Website: www.parks.des.qld.gov.au/parks/venman-bushland/about.html#management

REVIEWS:

“Beautiful walk through gorgeous scenery.” – Murray Chinn