UNICEF: 85,000 children dead as a result of the Yemen War

UNICEF: 85,000 children dead as a result of the Yemen War
Photo by Bernard Gagnon, via Wikimedia Commons

A recurring civil war In Yemen has caused the deaths of at least 85,000 a British charity claims. Studies taken from the United Nations show that in the time span of 3 years, from April 2015 to October 2018, 84,701 children that are below the age of 5 have died of malnutrition and hunger due to this stalemate war in Yemen.

The war in Yemen between two factions, the previous incumbent Yemeni government and the Houthi militia has brought havoc to innocent families and children for the past three years. OCHA concludes that more than 3 million families were forced to leave their homes fearing for their lives. Unicef representative Meritxel Relano said in a statement “An entire generation of children in Yemen is growing up knowing nothing but violence” and also said “Children in Yemen are suffering the devastating consequences of a war that is not of their making”.

The Yemeni government has called out to their allies pleading for help as they are determined to stop the bloodshed of innocent people and children. The Yemeni government has stated publicly that it is challenged with economic difficulties and has called upon Saudi Arabia for cooperation.

Although the death of many children and families is wide cross amongst Yemen, providing substantial aid is not possible as it’s extremely difficult to insert food, medicine or other essential needs into the war zone. Aid workers in Yemen are being told to leave the war zone because the high risk. In October of 2015, a hospital was attacked by Saudi-led rebel groups which killed 4 people as well as another attack in January of 2016 which killed 4 people in a bombing attack.

With little to no debate, the USA president has allowed military assistance to the UAE and Saudi allies. The president’s choice of allowing military expansion has been debated to prolong the war in Yemen as well and increase the death of more civilians.